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NOW is the time for YOUR Creative Exploration to begin!

Creative Exploration book -

Creative Exploration: A Six Week Process for Introducing Regular Creativity into your Life is a 62 page pdf ebook with:

  • Over 30 Creative Tips
  • Step by Step Process for Introducing Regular Creativity for Six Weeks and beyond!
  • Worksheets for taking stock of your creative goals, history, past hurdles
  • Worksheet for organizing and prioritizing all of your creative ideas.
  • Detailed process for introducing you to different mediums – with flexibility for your interests.

Would you like to:

  • Be creative on a regular basis and experience the joy that creativity brings?
  • Explore mediums and subjects, in search of your thing?

Creative Exploration is for you! Order now by clicking here.

Creative Freebies - weekly creative planner color wheel printable stickers Creative Exploration ebook
Order Creative Exploration now through September 24th and receive the printable Bonus Kit for FREE!
  • Printable Creative Weekly Planner worksheet
  • Printable Color Wheel and Color Wheel worksheet
  • Printable Creative Exploration “Stickers”

Do you spend more time scrolling and pinning or liking, than doing your own creative projects? Do you dabble in creativity but can’t seem to develop a regular routine? Would you like to be creative on a regular basis and experience the joy that creativity brings? Would you like to start on your own creative journey and explore mediums and subjects, in search of your thing?

Creativity is for EVERYONE. Talent is just a starting point.

I once read about an artist and wondered who told her she should pursue creativity, who gave her permission? Thankfully I realized she gave herself permission, and it was time for me to give myself permission. I had goals that involved exploring mediums, developing skills, and finding inspiration, but what I didn’t expect was the feeling that creativity gives me. For a long time regular creativity eluded me, but I finally made a commitment that has brought so much joy into my life, for five years and counting.

I want that for you! I want to share my process for developing a regular creative practice and start you on your creative journey.

Visit shop.eileenmckenna.com to order Creative Exploration now.


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Results of my “Assembly Line Painting” experiment. {Please vote for your favorite!}

assemblyfinal
I finished the four paintings that I working on in “assembly line” fashion. Click here to read more about how I approached working on these paintings.

Results: The results of the experiment are best described by this analogy: It’s like raising kids. You raise them in the same way – same environment, same food, activities, etc. but they all require different special attention and they all turn out different. And with each kid, you are a bit wiser (and more tired) so you do things differently each time – but maybe not better.

This is the inspiration painting:
bloomwave

The four painting above are numbered. Some of them were “worked” on more. For # 1-3 I used white gouache. As I worked I wasn’t sure what methods would be most successful – more details? more shadows? more white? more variation in color?

I’d love to hear what you have to say! Leave a comment and answer my poll below.

 

 

Conclusion: (Don’t all experiments have a conclusion?) Working this way, really allowed me to explore this type of painting and subject matter in more and more depth. If I had only painted one beach landscape, I wouldn’t have had the chance to try different techniques.

TRY IT! and let me know your results (and thoughts). Link to this post or if you’re on Instagram use #assemblylinepainting. Can’t wait to see! 🙂


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Assembly Line Painting {an experiment}

assembly
I recently had some success with a fairly quick beach landscape. The blooms that unintentionally formed and looked like crashing waves was a large part of the success. I was curious if I could recreate this and decided to set up several boards (watercolor paper taped to cardboard) to paint all at once. My plan was to paint specific sections in each painting, one right after the other, using a similar process.

The process:

  1. With blue watercolor pencil, draw horizon line
  2. Paint the sky
  3. With grey watercolor pencil define edge of the water and paint it
  4. Paint deep part of the ocean
  5. Add water at edge of the deep ocean to get sucked into deep part and create blooms (crashing waves)
  6. Add finishing touches

 

As you know, I’ve set up personal painting parties before, where I get started on several paintings at once. Usually the paintings share a common theme or inspiration. But this is the first time I’ve attempted several versions of the same painting at once. Immediately I noticed that I was learning nuances or experimenting a little on each painting in an attempt to make it better. I knew from the start that they would never be identical, which is something I didn’t want anyway.

This year I’ve seen, several times, that digging deeper in a theme can lead to better results. I think the same is true here. I’m learning by painting the same thing over and over.

At this point each painting needs some special attention and some finishing touches. I’m not sure I can do this step at the same time. We’ll see. 🙂

Hoping for some “bloom” waves:
bloomwaves


11 Comments

Learning with each painting

finalhydrangea
This Hydrangea was definitely a challenge. But whatever the outcome of a piece there’s still a takeaway – I learn something. When I multiply the number of sketches and paintings I’ve done since committing to my creative resolution (prob. between 315-400) and think of all I’ve learned (big and little things) – I am amazed.

While working on this piece, with all the little details of the flower, I thought, “This is hard.” But, it’s good to try hard things, it makes us better. And sometimes a piece isn’t about the final product, but about the process and the takeaway.

Here are my steps:
Wash, Ink, More Watercolor, More Ink
hwash haddinginkhink2hmorewatercolor

I worry that I overworked the final – too much ink. What is my takeaway from this piece? Hmmm. As I struggled to capture the dome of the hydrangea, I studied the photo, again and again. Should I have planned the piece out more from the beginning? Studied the photo before starting? I’m the girl who doesn’t read the instructions. Who dives right in and then tries to figure things out.

From the start I was fixated on the details of the flower petals – the shapes. In addition to this “detailed” thinking, I should have pulled back and thought about other “overall” elements before starting.